Types

A cut above the rest…

You have 364 days to find your perfect partner for March 14th (and we’re not talking about the Blowjob
here)… So why not work your way through the list below, and ensure you get lots of practice before
the Steak and BJ Day comes around (we’re talking about both parts here).


 

 

Chateaubriand steak
Usually served for two, center cut from the large end of the tenderloin. Sometimes it’s extra thick top sirloin.

Chuck steak
A cut from neck to the ribs.

Cube steak
A cut of meat, usually top round, tenderized by fierce pounding with a mallet or mechanical blades.

Filet Mignon
A cut from the small end of the tenderloin; the most tender and usually the most expensive cut by weight.

Flap steak
A cut from the bottom sirloin.

Flank steak
From the underside. Not as tender as steaks cut from the rib or loin.

Flat iron steak
A cut from under the shoulder blade.

Hanger steak or (French) onglet
A steak from near the center of the diaphragm. Flavorful, and very tender towards the edges, but sinewy
in the middle. Often called the butcher’s tenderloin or hanging tender.

Popeseye steak
Thinly sliced rump steak, originating in Scotland and available in the UK.

Rib eye steak (also known as Scotch fillet / Spencer)
A rib steak consisting of the longissimus muscle and the spinalis or cap. This comes from the primal rib
used to make prime rib which is typically oven roasted as opposed to grilled as is typical with rib eye.

Round steak, rump steak, or (French) rumsteak
A cut from the rump of the animal. A true grilling steak with good flavor though it can be tough
if not cooked properly.

Sirloin steak
A steak cut from the hip. Also tends to be less tough, resulting in a higher price tag.

Outside Skirt steak
A steak made from the diaphragm. Very flavorful, but also rather tough.

Inside skirt steak
A steak from the flank or bottom sirloin similar in appearance but more tender than the outside.

Strip steak, also known as Kansas City strip, New York strip, and Entrecôte
A high-quality steak cut from the strip loin, a muscle that is relatively low in connective tissue,
so it is particularly tender.

T-bone steak and Porterhouse
A cut from the tenderloin and strip loin, connected with a T-shaped bone (lumbar vertebra). The two
are distinguished by the size of the tenderloin in the cut. T-bones have smaller tenderloin sections, while
the Porterhouse – though generally smaller in the strip – will have more tenderloin. T-bone andPorterhouse
steaks are among the most expensive steaks on a menu because of the large individual portion size.

Tri-tip steak/roast
Also known as a Triangle Steak, due to its shape, it’s a boneless cut from the bottom sirloin butt.

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